Time Traveling Junkie

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whatisthat-velvet:

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Family of man killed by officer at Red Arrow Park says he was shot 15 times
MILWAUKEE UPDATE July 21, 2014 - The family of the man shot by police at Red Arrow Park wants the officer charged.  They say he shot Dontre Hamilton 15 times.
On Monday, the family got its first look into the investigation during a two and a half hour meeting with the Milwaukee County District Attorney and lead investigators.
 
"We just feel it was negligent homicide." said Dontre’s brother Nate, "15 shots was overkill."
 
Hamilton was shot during a mid afternoon scuffle in the park with an officer on April 30th. The family says the 31-year old had a history of mental illness but never hurt anyone.
 
Police say a pat down turned into a scuffle when Dontre grabbed the officers baton and started hitting him in the head. The family says more than 60 witness were interviewed with about a dozen getting a good look. But not everyone agreed on who did what with the baton.   
 
"There are witness statements backing that Dontre did hit the officer but there’s also other evidence that states Dontre never swung the baton," said Nate Hamilton. 



HERE’S AN ACTUAL WITNESS ACCOUNT



I only learned recently that Dontre suffered from mental illness, specifically schizophrenia. Dontre had been awake for days before the incident Wednesday and had been walking a long distance before finally resting underneath our arrow at Red Arrow Park. He was sleeping because he was exhausted, and he was only waiting for a ride from his brother. 

Around 1pm, my coworker and I noticed a man sleeping fairly close to where we have set up shop. He lay sleeping next to the big, stone red arrow: the landmark and namesake of the park. As per Starbucks policy, if we are uncertain or uncomfortable around a sleeping individual (or somebody that may be passed out), we are to call a non-emergency line to prevent any potential conflict – and that is precisely what was done.


A short while later, I took my first break of the day. I sat outside of the trailer, on a bench that was behind the trailer and the arrow. I had full view of Dontre merely sleeping underneath the arrow. To be clear, I never saw Dontre get up, walk around, panhandle, or even speak to anyone. A few minutes later, two officers approached him on foot to check him out. I could see them speaking with Dontre, who sat up to address and answer their questions. From the body language of both parties, nothing seemed out of place, nobody was tense, things were seemingly frictionless. It was probably a five-minute conversation, then the officers walked away. They didn’t escort him out or forcibly move him. To me, this indicated that there was no problem, no issue, and that there was no conflict here.
Once my break was over (approximately ten minutes), I walked back inside the trailer. I immediately was told by my coworker that they had called the non-emergency line a second time because Dontre was still there. At this moment, I was extremely frustrated with this. It was so obvious to me that Dontre was doing nothing illegal by being there, so calling the cops was only a waste of their time and resources. In that moment, I was heated enough to make a comment to my coworker about their persistence in this issue – I totally disagreed with heavy-handedly removing people that just want a place to exist.
About five or so minutes later, the same two officers approached our trailer café and asked if we were the ones calling them. My coworker informed them that it was them who called, and that they were worried about the presence of Dontre so close to our café, condiment bar, and the possible negative impact on the business. The officers informed them that Dontre was doing nothing illegal, there was nothing for them to enforce, and that we should stop calling. My coworker, obviously unsatisfied with the result, reluctantly let the issue drop. After that, there was some minor squabbling among ourselves because I didn’t like the way the issue was dealt with. I’m not a believer in removing things from my environment just because I’m uncomfortable with it, especially if we’re talking about another human being – and doubly especially for one that is doing absolutely nothing to anyone else.
I was wholly caught off guard for what would occur next. I didn’t see the entire event unfold. I was only alerted to the presence of another officer, after trouble had already started.
Around 3:30pm, I heard a man yelling something to the effect of “HEY!”, and then I moved to the window to see what was happening. At that moment, I saw a white police officer standing off against Dontre, who was holding the officer’s own baton in a defensive posture against said officer. I didn’t see the beginning of the fight or how it broke out, but I never once saw Dontre strike the officer with the baton. Again, I never witnessed the baton in Dontre’s hand make contact with the officer. I’ve seen it reported that Dontre struck the officer’s head repeatedly with the baton—and it may have happened near the beginning of the fight—but I never saw it and neither did my coworker. During this fight, I hear my coworker exclaim “That’s Chris,” who is our beat cop for the area. He is better known among the employees that have been at that location for longer.
Chris, currently unarmed since he lost his baton, lunged at Dontre to retrieve his weapon but missed. I never witnessed Dontre attack Chris. Dontre only reacted to Chris’ lunge, in what appeared to be, a purely defensive way. After missing, Chris was frozen for a second, then reached down for his side arm. When he pulled this weapon out, I had a sickly feeling about what was going to happen next. Chris didn’t say anything to Dontre.  Nothing like “calm down”, or “back away”, or anything of the sort, with his brandished firearm. He had his gun pointed at Dontre from about 10 feet away for a couple seconds.  That’s when I heard the shots.
I counted the shots as they happened. I guess I expected Chris to just disable him, so I didn’t know how many shots to expect. I counted 3…then 5…then 7…then 10 all in very quick succession. Surely a trained police officer could have disabled Dontre without putting 10 bullets into him. With the rapid, rhythmic fire, there was no way Chris was stopping to check if Dontre was still alive. Count to 10 in your head in a fast-paced, rhythmic manner and ask yourself if you’re shooting to kill. While my cynical side knew what was going to happen to Dontre and compelled me to turn away, my coworker didn’t. They saw the whole thing play out. They will tell you the same thing about how once that gun was pulled out, it was Dontre’s end.

Source

This is still an ongoing investigation


This is sickening.

whatisthat-velvet:

postracialcomments:

Family of man killed by officer at Red Arrow Park says he was shot 15 times

MILWAUKEE UPDATE July 21, 2014 - The family of the man shot by police at Red Arrow Park wants the officer charged.  They say he shot Dontre Hamilton 15 times.

On Monday, the family got its first look into the investigation during a two and a half hour meeting with the Milwaukee County District Attorney and lead investigators.
 
"We just feel it was negligent homicide." said Dontre’s brother Nate, "15 shots was overkill."
 
Hamilton was shot during a mid afternoon scuffle in the park with an officer on April 30th. The family says the 31-year old had a history of mental illness but never hurt anyone.
 
Police say a pat down turned into a scuffle when Dontre grabbed the officers baton and started hitting him in the head. The family says more than 60 witness were interviewed with about a dozen getting a good look. But not everyone agreed on who did what with the baton.   
 
"There are witness statements backing that Dontre did hit the officer but there’s also other evidence that states Dontre never swung the baton," said Nate Hamilton. 
HERE’S AN ACTUAL WITNESS ACCOUNT
I only learned recently that Dontre suffered from mental illness, specifically schizophrenia. Dontre had been awake for days before the incident Wednesday and had been walking a long distance before finally resting underneath our arrow at Red Arrow Park. He was sleeping because he was exhausted, and he was only waiting for a ride from his brother. 
Around 1pm, my coworker and I noticed a man sleeping fairly close to where we have set up shop. He lay sleeping next to the big, stone red arrow: the landmark and namesake of the park. As per Starbucks policy, if we are uncertain or uncomfortable around a sleeping individual (or somebody that may be passed out), we are to call a non-emergency line to prevent any potential conflict – and that is precisely what was done.

A short while later, I took my first break of the day. I sat outside of the trailer, on a bench that was behind the trailer and the arrow. I had full view of Dontre merely sleeping underneath the arrow. To be clear, I never saw Dontre get up, walk around, panhandle, or even speak to anyone. A few minutes later, two officers approached him on foot to check him out. I could see them speaking with Dontre, who sat up to address and answer their questions. From the body language of both parties, nothing seemed out of place, nobody was tense, things were seemingly frictionless. It was probably a five-minute conversation, then the officers walked away. They didn’t escort him out or forcibly move him. To me, this indicated that there was no problem, no issue, and that there was no conflict here.

Once my break was over (approximately ten minutes), I walked back inside the trailer. I immediately was told by my coworker that they had called the non-emergency line a second time because Dontre was still there. At this moment, I was extremely frustrated with this. It was so obvious to me that Dontre was doing nothing illegal by being there, so calling the cops was only a waste of their time and resources. In that moment, I was heated enough to make a comment to my coworker about their persistence in this issue – I totally disagreed with heavy-handedly removing people that just want a place to exist.

About five or so minutes later, the same two officers approached our trailer café and asked if we were the ones calling them. My coworker informed them that it was them who called, and that they were worried about the presence of Dontre so close to our café, condiment bar, and the possible negative impact on the business. The officers informed them that Dontre was doing nothing illegal, there was nothing for them to enforce, and that we should stop calling. My coworker, obviously unsatisfied with the result, reluctantly let the issue drop. After that, there was some minor squabbling among ourselves because I didn’t like the way the issue was dealt with. I’m not a believer in removing things from my environment just because I’m uncomfortable with it, especially if we’re talking about another human being – and doubly especially for one that is doing absolutely nothing to anyone else.

I was wholly caught off guard for what would occur next. I didn’t see the entire event unfold. I was only alerted to the presence of another officer, after trouble had already started.

Around 3:30pm, I heard a man yelling something to the effect of “HEY!”, and then I moved to the window to see what was happening. At that moment, I saw a white police officer standing off against Dontre, who was holding the officer’s own baton in a defensive posture against said officer. I didn’t see the beginning of the fight or how it broke out, but I never once saw Dontre strike the officer with the baton. Again, I never witnessed the baton in Dontre’s hand make contact with the officer. I’ve seen it reported that Dontre struck the officer’s head repeatedly with the baton—and it may have happened near the beginning of the fight—but I never saw it and neither did my coworker. During this fight, I hear my coworker exclaim “That’s Chris,” who is our beat cop for the area. He is better known among the employees that have been at that location for longer.

Chris, currently unarmed since he lost his baton, lunged at Dontre to retrieve his weapon but missed. I never witnessed Dontre attack Chris. Dontre only reacted to Chris’ lunge, in what appeared to be, a purely defensive way. After missing, Chris was frozen for a second, then reached down for his side arm. When he pulled this weapon out, I had a sickly feeling about what was going to happen next. Chris didn’t say anything to Dontre.  Nothing like “calm down”, or “back away”, or anything of the sort, with his brandished firearm. He had his gun pointed at Dontre from about 10 feet away for a couple seconds.  That’s when I heard the shots.

I counted the shots as they happened. I guess I expected Chris to just disable him, so I didn’t know how many shots to expect. I counted 3…then 5…then 7…then 10 all in very quick succession. Surely a trained police officer could have disabled Dontre without putting 10 bullets into him. With the rapid, rhythmic fire, there was no way Chris was stopping to check if Dontre was still alive. Count to 10 in your head in a fast-paced, rhythmic manner and ask yourself if you’re shooting to kill. While my cynical side knew what was going to happen to Dontre and compelled me to turn away, my coworker didn’t. They saw the whole thing play out. They will tell you the same thing about how once that gun was pulled out, it was Dontre’s end.
This is still an ongoing investigation

This is sickening.

(via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)